Residential Propane Safety

Propane is used by millions, not just at home, but also in businesses around the world. Many different commercial settings rely on propane to power heating, cooking, auto, forklift, and machinery operations daily.

Due to its clean, affordable, and accessible qualities, propane is the fuel choice in many regions. Beyond the reach of natural gas mains, propane is frequently used in business operations for its quick, easy transport qualities. In addition, propane is the third most popular vehicle fuel worldwide.

The United States government named propane a clean fuel as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act, and many businesses now choose propane when making the choice to "go green".

Propane is the growing choice of many businesses on the road, on the farm, and at work.


HOW CAN I KEEP MY HOME SAFE WHEN I AM AWAY FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD?


If you're leaving your home for an extended period, consider closing all propane supply valves. This includes the main gas supply valve on the propane tank as well as gas supply valves located near individual appliances. WHEN YOU RETURN to your home after an extended absence, contact your propane retailer or a qualified service technician to conduct a leak check before the propane is turned on and to re-light the pilot lights.

IF YOU LIGHT A PILOT LIGHT YOURSELF, YOU ARE TAKING THE RISK OF STARTING A FIRE OR AN EXPLOSION. MANY SERIOUS INJURIES OCCUR WHEN PEOPLE ATTEMPT TO LIGHT PILOT LIGHTS. PROCEED WITH GREAT CAUTION AND FOLLOW THESE RULES:

  • Carefully follow all of the manufacturer's instructions and warnings concerning the appliance.

  • If the appliance is in a basement or closed room, thoroughly ventilate the area before lighting the pilot.

  • DO NOT smoke or have any source of ignition (such as flames or spark-producing materials) in the area before lighting the pilot.

  • Be especially alert for the smell of propane. Sniff at floor level before lighting a pilot.

  • IF YOU SMELL GAS, DO NOT LIGHT THE PILOT LIGHT.

  • DO NOT allow any extra or unnecessary people (especially children) to remain in the room or area of the building where you are lighting a pilot.

  • DO NOT try to light pilot lights in any area where other odors may make it difficult for you to detect the smell of a propane leak.

  • DO NOT light the pilot if a musty or damp smell persists. These conditions can mask the smell of propane.

  • DO NOT apply force or use tools on the pilot light or its control. This could cause damage that leads to gas leakage. Use only your hands to operate knobs, switches, or buttons.

  • DO NOT attempt to let air out of gas lines by opening a valve or fitting inside a building or enclosed space. You may release gas and not be able to smell it.

  • DO NOT apply oil to a sticky knob or button on a gas control valve. Oil can cause the control valve mechanism to stick and malfunction.